Dungeon Master Assistance

A place to share thoughts and ideas about Dungeons and Dragons

D&D 5E – Item Weights

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Weights for a Few Common Items

The equipment tables in the Player’s Handbook don’t quite cover everything a character might decide to pick up and carry. Here are weight figures for a few such items.

Armchair 20 lb.
Chair, simple 5 lb.
Door, iron (2 in. thick) 3,200 lb.
Door, stone ( 2 in. thick) 2,200 lb.
Door, simple wooden (1 in. thick) 150 lb.
Door, good wooden (1 1/2” thick) 225 lb.
Door, strong wooden (2 in. thick) 350 lb.
Footstool 2 lb.
Petrified creature x8 lb.
Spirits, cask 18 lb.
Spirits, hogshead 750 lb.
Spirits, keg 90 lb.
Spirits, barrel 375 lb.
Statue, Gargantuan 19,200 lb.
Statue, Huge 8,100 lb.
Statue, Large 2,400 lb.
Statue, Medium 300 b.
Statue, Small 40 lb.
Statue, Tiny 3 lb.
Table, banquet 225 lb.
Table, small 60 lb.
Tapestry 100 lb.
Workbench 300 lb.

Table Notes
Here are a few notes to clarify the table entries.

  • Armchair: This entry assumes fine hardwood construction and a leather or cloth cover. The weight given is for a chair built for a Medium creature. Cut the weight in half for each size category below Medium and double the weight for each size category above Medium.
  • Chair, Simple: This is a plain chair made from inexpensive hardwood, and it has no arms. See the armchair entry to adjust the weight for larger or smaller creatures.
  • Doors: All doors are assumed to be 7 feet high and 4 feet wide. The listed weight includes hinges, handle, and lock appropriate for the door’s overall construction.
  • Footstool: This assumes a plain, wooden stool about 6 inches high, with a round top about 18 inches across.
  • Petrified Creature: To calculate a petrified creature’s weight, multiply the creature’s normal weight by 8 and add the weight of any gear the creature was carrying at the time of petrification. When a creature is magically turned to stone, it and all its gear turn to stone. This tends to make metal gear weigh a little less, but nonmetal gear gets heavier, so the two tend to average out.
  • Table, Banquet: This table is built to comfortably seat twelve Medium creatures (about 4-1/2 feet wide and 8 feet long). See the armchair entry to adjust the weight for a table built to seat larger or smaller creatures.
  • Table, Small: The represents a plain wooden table that might be found in a modest home or merchant’s shop. It’s big enough to seat six Medium creatures (about 3-1/2 feet wide and 7 feet long). See the armchair entry to adjust the weight for a table built to seat larger or smaller creatures.
  • Spirits: The spirits entry assumes a barrel-shaped container made from hardwood staves and iron hoops. A cask contains 2 gallons of liquid, a hogshead holds 88 gallons, a keg holds 10 gallons, and a barrel holds 44 gallons. You can use these figures for any liquid-based contents. Containers with dry contents might weigh anywhere from one quarter to two-thirds as much.
  • Statues: The statues are assumed to be made of hollow metal construction (bronze) or of solid stone (marble). A statue of solid metal will weight 4 times this amount. Statue sizes refer to creature sizes as listed in the Player’s Handbook and in the Monster Manual, and they represent figures in the mid-range for each size category. A statue of the listed size could easily weigh anywhere from one half to twice the listed weight. All statue weights include an attached base or pedestal. For statues made of other materials adjust the weight based on the relative weight of that material. Refer to the material weight table here.
  • Tapestry: Assumes a woven wool tapestry about 10 feet square and about 1/4 inch thick. You also can use this figure for carpets or rugs.
  • Workbench: This is a bench about 3 feet high, 3 feet wide, and 8 feet long, with sturdy legs and top and a shelf or footrest below.

D&D 5E – Weights of Materials

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Weights of Materials

“Wow – we got this great new thing. What does it weigh?”

Metal

Weight per cubic foot

Weapon or Armor weight*

Adamantine

400 lb.

Same as steel

Brass

550 lb.

Same as steel

Bronze

550 lb.

Same as steel

Cold Iron

500 lb.

Same as steel

Copper

550 lb.

Same as steel

Electrum

900 lb.

Twice that of steel

Gold

1,200 lb.

2 1/2 times that of steel

Iron

500 lb.

Same as steel

Lead

700 lb.

1 1/2 times that of steel

Mithral

250 lb.

Half that of steel

Platinum

1,350 lb.

Three times that of steel

Silver

650 lb.

Same as steel

Steel

500 lb.

PHB metal weapons and armor are steel

Tin

450 lb.

Same as steel

Material

Weight per cubic foot

Weapon or Armor weight*

Acid

90 lb.

Same as steel

Alcohol

50 lb.

Brick

100 lb.

One quarter that of steel

Cereal

40 lb.

Clay

150 lb.

One third that of steel

Coal

80 lb.

Earth, Dry

90 lb.

Earth, Mud

110 lb.

Fat

60 lb.

Flour

30 lb.

Glass

150 lb.

One third that of steel

Granite

170 lb.

One third that of steel

Graphite

130 lb.

One third that of steel

Gravel

100 lb.

Hay

20 lb.

Leather

60 lb.

Lye

100 lb.

Marble

170 lb.

One third that of steel

Masonry, Rubble

140 lb.

Mortar

100 lb.

Oil

60 lb.

Paper

40 lb.

One tenth that of steel

Pitch

60 lb.

Plaster

140 lb.

Pumice

40 lb.

Rubber

90 lb.

One third that of steel

Sand, Dry

100 lb.

Sand, Wet

120 lb.

Sandstone

150 lb.

One third that of steel

Slate

180 lb.

One third that of steel

Snow, Freshly Fallen

10 lb.

Snow, Wet

50 lb.

One tenth that of steel

Soap Stone

170 lb.

One third that of steel

Soda Ash

70 lb.

Sodium

60 lb.

Sulphur

120 lb.

Tar

70 lb.

Water

60 lb.

Water, Ice

50 lb.

One tenth that of steel

Wood – Green

50 lb.

One tenth that of steel

Wood – Dry

30 lb.

One tenth that of steel

Wool

80 lb.

One tenth that of steel

* To calculate the weight a piece of armor or a weapon would be if made of one of these meterals, look up the weight of that item in the PHB (Player’s Handbook). Then find the material in the above table and look under the “Weapon or Armor weight” column. If it says “Same as steel” then it will weigh the same as the one in the PHB. Otherwise change the weight as indicated.

There are 1,728 cubic inches in a cubic foot. We can round that off to 2,000.

To make a quick estimate of the weight of an item, it is often easer to work in cubic inches than it is to work in cubic feet. Divide the weight per cubic foot for the material (in the table above) by 2,000. Then multiply the resulting fraction by the number of cubic inches of material in the item. Round this down to an even pound.

For metals, you can get the value of the item by multiplying the weight of the item by the metal’s value per pound (here).

D&D 5E – Metals

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Value of Metals in D&D

Metal Cost per lb. Ferrus? AC Description
Adamantine 5,000 gp ferrous 23 An alloy of adamant (a strong but brittle metal), silver and electrum. Adamantine  is black,  but  has  a  clear  green  sheen  in  candlelight – a  sheen  that sharpens  to  purple-white  under  the  light  given  off  by  most  magical  radiances  and  by  will-o-wisps.
Brass 3 sp Non-ferrous 16 A yellow-ish metal that somewhat resembles gold. An alloy of copper and zinc.
Bronze 4 sp Non-ferrous 18 A red-ish brown metal. An alloy of copper and tin
Cold Iron 4 sp ferrous 20 Cold iron is iron found in a pure state (either meteoric iron or an especially rich ore) and is forged at a lower temperature to preserve its delicate properties.
Copper 1 gp Non-ferrous 16 This well-known pure metal has a distinctive pinkish sheen.
Electrum 25 gp Non-ferrous 20 A natural alloy of silver and gold.
Gold 50 gp Non-ferrous 15 This well-known pure metal is the softest of workable metallic substances.
Iron 1 sp ferrous 19 Iron is a silver-white malleable metal that readily rusts in moist air, occurs native in meteorites and combined in most igneous rocks. It is the most used of metals.
Lead 2 sp Non-ferrous 14 Lead is a heavy, grey, soft, malleable, metal.
Mithral 2,500 gp Non-ferrous 21 This silvery-blue, shining metal is derived from soft, glittering, silvery-black ore.
Platinum 500 gp Non-ferrous 20 This light gray metal with very slight bluish tinge is strong, difficult to melt, and resistant to most chemicals.
Silver 10 gp Non-ferrous 17 This relatively common valuable metal is the most associated with and suitable for magic.
Steel 5 gp ferrous 19 Steel is an alloy made out of Iron and Carbon.
Tin 3 sp Non-ferrous 12 A soft, silvery-white metal that is often combined with other metals or used as a layer to protect various metals.

Most of the following information is from “VoLo’s Guide to All Things Magical”.

 Adamant

This is the pure metal form of the hard, jet-black ferro magnetic ore known as adamantite, from which the famous alloy adamantine is made. Adamant is rarely found in nature, but when it is, it is always be in large spherical pockets in hardened volcanic flows. Adamant is one of the hardest substances known, but it is also brittle. A sword made of adamant could slice through most metals but would snap off if struck by another blade or even a smartly wielded wooden cudgel.

Adamantine

This alloy, of five-eighths adamant to two-eighths silver and one-eighth electrum (itself a natural alloy of silver and gold) retains the hardness of adamant, but combines it with a rugged durability that makes adamantine so hard to shatter that it is the favored substance for the making of war hammer heads, the best nonmithral armor, and harbor chains. (By one of the miracles granted by the gods, adamantine can also be derived by combining steel and mithral if one knows how. Adamantine is black, but has a clear green sheen in candlelight a sheen that sharpens to purple-white under the light given off by most magical radiances and by will-o-wisps.

Adamantine is tricky to make, and must be forged and worked at very high temperatures by smiths who know exactly what they are doing and who have access to special oils to slake and temper the hot metal in. Almost all such expert smiths are dwarves, as the Deep Folk guard the secrets of working adamant jealously, but a priest or wizard seeking to enchant items can make use of finished adamantine items and need not necessarily have to work with a smith to create an adamantine work anew.

Copper

This well-known pure metal, with its distinctive pinkish sheen, is the best widely available purifier and amalgamator among metals. It is soft and easily worked, widely known. The wizard and especially the priest seeking to work with a substance or item not suited to his or her faith or purpose can make the offending item usable by adding at least half the item’s weight of copper to the item. (For example, by sheathing it in copper or adding a longer handle plated in copper, or similar means.) Holy or unholy water should not be stored for any length of time in copper vessels, because the metal will neutralize either in a few months, changing them to normal water.

Gold

This well-known pure metal is the softest of workable metallic substances, and one of the best conductors among them. Despite its high value, it is relatively common and is favored for use in ornamentation in the making of magical items, often being used as an inlay in graven runes or inscriptions, where meld magics can keep it from being damaged or falling out through rough handling. Gold has the important ability to hold multiple enchantments, even conflicting ones, and keep them from affecting each other or the stability of the gold-adorned item.

Mithral

Known as truemetal to the dwarves, this silvery-blue, shining metal is derived from soft, glittering, silvery-black ore found in rare veins and pockets all over, from the depths of the Underdark to surface rocks. Mithral can be combined with steel (varying alloys of iron and carbon) to derive adamantine if one has no access to adamantite ore, but this process is both difficult and known only to a very few dwarves, who do not perform it for nondwarves unless there is a very good reason.

Mithral is the lightest and most supple of metals hard enough to be used in the making of armor; it is extremely valuable.

Silver

This relatively common valuable pure metal is known to the elves as “the sheath and shield of Art” because, of all metals, it is the most associated with and suitable for magic. Many dwarves use silver in various alloy formulae of their own devising or that have been handed down through clans for generations. Most of the beauty of metalwork down through the ages has been associated with the gleam and hue of mirror-polished, untarnished silver, and it has always been associated with the adornment of magical items.

Campaign Website

alabaster-portal

The Alabaster Portal

I thought you might like to see the website I am using to manage my tabletop game. I call it the Alabaster Portal. It is a free, private, google site that I set up for my players and me to use for our game. I looked at the popular Obsidian Portal and decided that I wanted a little more control over my site that that allowed.

Many thanks to sharklops over at Reddit for his Pathfinder RPG Campaign Website Template. I started with that then modified it extensively to work with my 5th edition campaign.

I set up a WIKI ten years ago and never used it much. I liked the idea, but it wasn’t very “pretty”. Google sites allows me to set page level access permissions, so I can set the permissions for each player to modify and add to his character’s information and also edit pages such as the adventure log. It has been popular with my players so far.

I had a request to make my site available as a template. If you want to create your own, similar to mine – you can use this template :

https://www.sites.google.com/site/5etemplatesite/

What do you think? Do you use a WIKI or Obsidian Portal, or something else, or is this all too much work for something not very useful?

 

D&D 5E – Picking Locks

thievestools

How to Pick a Lock

There is some confusion on what the rules are for picking a lock. It all depends on whether or not you have a set of thieves tols and if you know how to use them. There are six different possibilities.

  1. You have Thieves’ Tools and are proficient with them. You can attempt to pick the lock and get to add your proficiency bonus to the (Dex) check.
  2. You have Thieves’ Tools and have expertise with Thieves’ Tools.  You can attempt to pick the lock and get to add twice your proficiency bonus the (Dex) check.
  3. You have Thieves’ Tools but you aren’t proficient with them. You can still attempt to pick the lock but you don’t get to add your proficiency bonus (since it’s a bonus you only get when you are proficient with something).
  4. You don’t have any Thieves’ Tools so you improvise some (with your DM’s approval) but you aren’t proficient with Thieves’ Tools. You can still attempt to pick the lock but with disadvantage.
  5. You have improvised tools and you have proficiency with Thieves’ Tools. You have disadvantage on picking the lock, but you do get to add your proficiency bonus.
  6. No Thieves’ Tools and no improvised tools. Take a strength check to throw the closest party member through the door or crowbar the lock. Basically, look for another way to get past it because you can’t pick it.

 

Starting a new campaign.

Starting new 5th Edition D&D group Sat October 1st, 2016

If anyone knows of someone who would be interested in joining a new group, I will be starting a new campaign at my house on October 1st. I live in Colorado Springs, near I-25 and Fillmore St.
We will be playing the published “Age of Worms” adventure path using 5th edition rules in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. I would like to have a full table with 4-5 players. The group will meet on Saturday afternoons. Diversity and a mix of genders, age 21+, is the intention.
If interested go to this site for more information: https://sites.google.com/site/alabasterportal/

 

(I will be out of state for the next week, so I may not respond to comments until after Sep. 15th.)

D&D 5E – Time Tracking Tool

Tine-Tracker

DM Tool for Tracking Time

Download your free copy here.

I have tried several different ways to keep track of time in a dungeon. Years ago I even wrote a “Time Tender” software program. I was thinking of getting a toy clock, or a broken clock that I could turn the hands on. Thinking of clocks, I came up with this simple idea, and it works! Download and print as many of these as you may need. The idea is that you use a pencil to mark off the time as your players explore the dungeon.

 

Each clockface represents one day. One sheet can track 4 days. The hours are marked around the sides. Midnight is at the bottom and Noon is at the top. There are 6 little boxes between each hour. Each box represents 10 minutes. I fill in each box as time passes in the adventure. I find this works well. I say it takes 10 minutes to search a room. I mark off 10 minutes after each combat for searching bodies, recover arrows, clean up, etc. Moving along a cooridor doesn’t take much time unless it is very long or they are being slow. I also mark time for other activities as well: one hour for a short rest, eight hours for a long rest, overland travel time, etc.

There is plenty of blank space to scribble notes.

Enjoy!

Minions and Hordes

The player characters are surrounded on all sides. Orcs and goblins press in, pushing them further and further from the salvation of the cave’s exit. Blades, javelins, and arrows fly in from all directions, battering and hammering against the shimmering magic barrier that protects them. The mage looks like he’s about to faint. The hordes…

via D&D 5e Hack: Minions and Hordes — Wisdom Save

Check out this excellent post on minions and hordes from Wisdom Save. I will definitely be using this!

D&D 5E – DM Screen – portrait version

DM_Screen_P--01

DM_Screen_P--03

DM_Screen_P--02

Vertical 5E – DM Screen

Download your free copy here.

This is for John Edmond and anyone else that prefers a vertical  DM Screen.

You can still get my horizontal version here.

D&D 5E – Condition Cards

Condition Cards

Download your free copy HERE.

I re-did my condition cards. I added backs and put them all in one PDF file.

I had a good time designing the smiley faces. I hope you get a kick out of them.

The fronts are form-fillable so you can make changes to them if you want. That allows non-English players to change them to read correctly in their language. Also you can make changes to allow for house rules, or other gaming systems.

When I print them on my ink-jet printer I can’t get the backs to line up exactly with the fronts, so if it doesn’t work for you the only thing I can suggest is to print the backs on separate sheets and put the fronts and backs together some how (paste or clear sleeves?). They are only off about 1/16″ when I print them, so I will just live with the fronts being a little off centered.

I added a “Hidden” and a “Temporary Condition” card. If you play 5E you know that there is no “Hidden” condition. This card can still be used as a reminder that someone is trying to hide. The “Temporary Condition” card is for things like spells that add to armor class or hit points, or some such. It is a catch all for any conditions that you may want to keep track of during combat.

The colors I used match the colors of a set of “ponytailers” that I picked up at Walmart for about $2.00. They are fabric covered rubber bands about 1″ in diameter that can be put around the figures on the battle mat. I used light gray for white and dark grey for black.

Enjoy!